Call for Participation: [sic!] Summer Institute Cologne 2014 - The Invisible

05 March, 2014

[sic!] Summer Institute Cologne 2014 – Theatre Studies, Art History, Media Studies

Cologne University’s international interdisciplinary summer institute [sic!] 2014 will take place from 15th to 23rd of July 2014. After last year’s founding event on “Techniques of Imagination”, participants and faculty of [sic!] 2014 will focus on historiographical perspectives on “The Invisible”. We invite graduate and postgraduate students from Art History, Media, Film, Theatre, Performance and Cultural Studies to apply for our international program. Each participant may choose from three seminars led by a pair of scholars from Northwestern University (Evanston, USA) and the University of Cologne. 2014’s program includes seminars on Art History, Theatre and Performance Studies and Film and Media Studies. In addition to our seminars we offer interdisciplinary academic workshops that allow for a dialogue across the seminars. Each participant can choose one seminar and a workshop, thus composing his/her individual study program. Seminars and workshops are framed by study trips, evening lectures by faculty, and poster presentations by students.

[sic!] will be hosted by the Theaterwissenschaftliche Sammlung (TWS) of Cologne University, one of the largest archives of theatre history in Europe. Situated in the picturesque manor house Schloss Wahn, located in the outskirts of Cologne, [sic!] provides a unique setting for learning and discussion, combining gracious surroundings with facilities for daily meetings, and offering access to exceptional archival materials in proximity to one of Germany's most vibrant metropolises.

All sessions will be conducted in English.

A provisional timetable and more information can be found on our website http://sic.uni-koeln.de

 

The Invisible

While [sic!] 2013 looked into questions and theories about “Techniques of Imagination”, this year’s program investigates “The Invisible”. The ambiguity of this topic – seemingly an anathema for Media and Cultural Studies – turns our attention to important questions of methodological approaches to what cannot be seen (anymore) but was/is there nevertheless. “The Invisible” also turns our attention to phenomena that transcend our perceptual order. How are these phenomena always connected to medial and artistic strategies? What methodological approaches are used to work with them? The framing questions – how can “The Invisible” be shown, performed, depicted, enacted, researched? – guarantee stimulating dialogue between all disciplines at [sic!] 2014. The perspectives on “The Invisible” can be rooted in theatre, media and art history, film studies, archaeology, digital media, video games, cultural history, performance practice, and many more traditions.

[sic!] 2014 invites scholars and students alike to look for old manifestations, new traces, and novel approaches (in)to cultural history and historiography.

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